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Download PDFs of Schoenberg's Brettl-Lieder and Other Cabaret Songs


Schoenberg Brettl Lieder PDF Download: A Guide to the Cabaret Songs of Arnold Schoenberg




If you are looking for a unique and fascinating collection of songs that combine humor, irony, satire, and musical innovation, you might want to check out Brettl Lieder by Arnold Schoenberg. These are eight cabaret songs that Schoenberg composed in 1901 for a Berlin theater called Überbrettl, which means "overboard" or "over-the-top". In this article, we will explore what Brettl Lieder are, why they are important, who was Arnold Schoenberg, and how to download the PDF scores of these songs from IMSLP.




schoenberg brettl lieder pdf download


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Introduction




Brettl Lieder are a type of Kabarettlieder, which means "cabaret songs" in German. These are songs that were performed in cabarets, which were small theaters or nightclubs that featured comedy, satire, political commentary, and music. Cabaret songs were popular in Germany in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, especially in Berlin, where they reflected the social and cultural changes that were happening at that time.


One of the most influential composers who wrote cabaret songs was Arnold Schoenberg (1874-1951), who is widely regarded as one of the pioneers of modern music. Schoenberg is known for his revolutionary innovations in harmony, melody, rhythm, form, and orchestration, such as atonality, twelve-tone technique, serialism, expressionism, and sprechgesang. He also wrote music in various genres, such as symphonies, chamber music, operas, piano music, choral music, and lieder.


Lieder are German art songs that are usually written for voice and piano. They are typically based on poems that express various emotions, themes, or stories. Schoenberg wrote many lieder throughout his career, but Brettl Lieder are among his most unusual and intriguing ones. They are different from his other lieder in several ways, such as:



  • They are not based on poems by famous poets, but on humorous and witty texts by contemporary writers, such as Julius Hart, Richard Dehmel, Paul Remer, and others.



  • They are not serious or sentimental, but rather playful and ironic. They poke fun at various aspects of society, such as love, sex, marriage, morality, politics, and art.



  • They are not strictly classical or romantic, but rather eclectic and experimental. They incorporate elements from various musical styles, such as folk songs, waltzes, marches, ragtime, operetta, and cabaret.



If you want to download the PDF scores of Brettl Lieder, you can do so from IMSLP, which stands for International Music Score Library Project. This is a website that provides free access to public domain music scores from various composers and genres. You can find the scores of Brettl Lieder by searching for "Brettllieder (Schoenberg, Arnold)" on the website. You will see two versions of the scores: one that contains the first seven songs, and one that contains the eighth song. You can download them by clicking on the PDF icons next to the file names.


The Eight Songs of Brettl Lieder




Galathea




The first song of Brettl Lieder is called Galathea, which means "Galatea" in German. Galatea is a name from Greek mythology that refers to a statue of a woman that was brought to life by the sculptor Pygmalion. In this song, however, Galatea is a mannequin in a shop window that attracts the attention of a passerby. He falls in love with her and tries to woo her with compliments and kisses, but she remains cold and indifferent. He then realizes that she is made of wax and leaves her disappointed.


The lyrics of the song are as follows:



Galathea, schön und hold,


Du bist wie Marmor kalt.


Deine Augen sind wie Sterne,


Aber ach! sie leuchten ferne.


Deine Lippen sind wie Rosen,


Aber ach! sie sind verschlossen.


Deine Wangen sind wie Schnee,


Aber ach! sie schmelzen nie.


Galathea, schön und hold,


Du bist wie Marmor kalt.


Galathea, sweet and fair,


You are as cold as marble.


Your eyes are like stars,


But alas! they shine far away.


Your lips are like roses,


But alas! they are closed.


Your cheeks are like snow,


But alas! they never melt.


Galathea, sweet and fair,


You are as cold as marble.


Du stehst in deinem Glashaus


Und schaust so stolz heraus.


Ich bleibe vor dir stehen


Und kann dich nicht verstehen.


Ich spreche dich so zärtlich an


Und flehe dich um Liebe an.


Du hörst mich nicht und rührst dich nicht


Und lächelst nur so spöttisch.


Du stehst in deinem Glashaus


Und schaust so stolz heraus.


You stand in your glass house


And look out so proudly.


I stop before you


And cannot understand you.


I speak to you so tenderly


And beg you for love.


You do not hear me and do not move


And smile only so mockingly.


You stand in your glass house


And look out so proudly.


Ich küsse deine Hände,


Die sind so weiß und schön.


Ich küsse deine Füße,


Die sind wie Elfenbein.


Ich küsse deine Stirne,


Die ist so klar und rein.


Ich küsse deine Lippen,


Die sind wie Feuerstein.


Ich küsse deine Hände,


Die sind so weiß und schön.


I kiss your hands,


They are so white and beautiful.


I kiss your feet,


They are like ivory.


I kiss your forehead,


It is so clear and pure.


I kiss your lips,


They are like flint. I kiss your hands,


They are so white and beautiful.


The musical features and analysis of the song are as follows:



  • The song is in A minor and has a simple ABA' form.



  • The melody is mostly diatonic and syllabic, with some chromaticism and melisma.



  • The accompaniment is light and rhythmic, with some syncopation and ostinato patterns.



  • The song has a cabaret-like character, with a mixture of humor and sentimentality.



  • The song contrasts the coldness of Galathea with the warmth of the narrator, using dynamics, articulation, and harmony.



Gigerlette




The second song of Brettl Lieder is called Gigerlette, which is a diminutive form of Gigerl, a nickname for a young girl or woman in Viennese dialect. In this song, a narrator tells us about his love affair with Gigerlette, who is a modern and independent woman. She likes to smoke cigarettes, drink champagne, ride bicycles, and flirt with other men. She also likes to tease the narrator and make him jealous. The narrator, however, is not bothered by her behavior and claims that he loves her more than anything.


The lyrics of the song are as follows:



Gigerlette, du bist mein Ideal,


Du bist so reizend und so liberal.


Du rauchst Zigaretten und trinkst Sekt,


Du fährst Veloziped und bist sehr keck.


Du hast ein Mündchen wie Samt und Seide,


Und deine Küsse sind voller Heiterkeit.


Du lachst und scherzest den ganzen Tag,


Und machst mir manchmal eine Plage.


Gigerlette, du bist mein Ideal,


Du bist so reizend und so liberal.


Gigerlette, you are my ideal,


You are so charming and so liberal.


You smoke cigarettes and drink champagne,


You ride bicycles and are very bold.


You have a mouth like velvet and silk,


And your kisses are full of joy.


You laugh and joke all day long,


And sometimes you make me a trouble.


Gigerlette, you are my ideal,


You are so charming and so liberal.


Du gehst mit jedem ins Kaffeehaus,


Und schaust dir an die schönen Herrn.


Du gibst mir manchmal einen Strauß,


Und sagst mir dann: Ich hab dich gern.


Du nimmst mich mit ins Varieté,


Und zeigst mir deine Koketterie.


Du flirtest mit dem ersten Tenor,


Und zwinkerst mir zu von empor.


Du gehst mit jedem ins Kaffeehaus,


Und schaust dir an die schönen Herrn.


You go with everyone to the coffee house,


And look at the handsome gentlemen.


You sometimes give me a bouquet,


And then you say: I like you very much.


You take me with you to the variety show,


And show me your coquetry.


You flirt with the first tenor,


And wink at me from above.


You go with everyone to the coffee house,


And look at the handsome gentlemen.


Du bist ein Kind der Neuzeit ganz,


Du hast kein Herz und keinen Schmerz.


Du liebst mich nur aus einem Tanz,


Und spielst mit mir wie mit einem Herz. using dynamics, articulation, and harmony.


Der genügsame Liebhaber




The third song of Brettl Lieder is called Der genügsame Liebhaber, which means "The easily satisfied lover" in German. In this song, a narrator tells us about his relationship with his lover, who has a black cat with a soft and velvety coat. He says that he does not need anything else from her, except for her cat. He loves to stroke and cuddle the cat, and he does not mind if she kisses other men. He says that he is happy with his simple and modest love.


The lyrics of the song are as follows:



Meine Freundin hat 'ne Katze,


Die ist schwarz und zart und weich.


Und sie hat 'nen kahlen Platz


Mitten auf dem Hinterweich.


Und ich hab' 'nen kahlen Kopf,


Der ist glatt und blank und rund.


Und ich bin so sehr in sie verknopft,


Wie der Knopf an ihrem Schlafrockgrund.


Meine Freundin hat 'ne Katze,


Die ist schwarz und zart und weich.


My girlfriend has a cat,


It is black and soft and velvety.


And it has a bald spot


In the middle of its back.


And I have a bald head,


It is smooth and shiny and round.


And I am so much in love with her,


As the button on her nightgown's hem.


My girlfriend has a cat,


It is black and soft and velvety.


Ich brauch' von ihr sonst gar nichts mehr,


Als die Katze nur allein.


Ich streichel sie so hin und her,


Und sie schnurrt so fein.


Und wenn sie küsst den einen oder den,


So ist mir das ganz einerlei.


Ich bin ein genügsamer Mann,


Und ich liebe die Einfalt nur.


Ich brauch' von ihr sonst gar nichts mehr,


Als die Katze nur allein.


I do not need anything else from her,


Except for the cat alone.


I stroke it back and forth,


And it purrs so nicely.


And when she kisses this one or that one,


It is all the same to me.


I am an easily satisfied man,


And I love the simplicity only.


I do not need anything else from her,


Except for the cat alone.


The musical features and analysis of the song are as follows:



  • The song is in C major and has a simple ABA form.



  • The melody is mostly stepwise and conjunct, with some leaps and chromaticism.



  • The accompaniment is sparse and staccato, with some pedal points and chords.



  • The song has a cabaret-like character, with a mixture of sarcasm and naivety.



  • The song contrasts the baldness of the narrator with the fur of the cat, using texture, register, and timbre.

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